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Background The Hubble Deep Field (hereon-after the HDF) is an iconic image from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). In 1995 the HST was commanded to stare at a tiny patch of space in the constellation of Ursa Major that is almost devoid of stars and is far from the plane of the galaxy, enabling the telescope to stare out of the galaxy into the depths of the Universe. It did this for about 190 hours with a total of 340 exposures and in so doing captured some of the most distant galaxies in the Universe, some of which are an astonishing 12 billion light years away. Location of The Hubble Deep Field The Hubble Deep Field through the Hubble Space Telescope The HDF is located above the “bowl” of The Plough (or Big Dipper as it is called in North America) asterism in Ursa Major as can be seen in…

M27 is a famous planetary nebula in the constellation of Vulpecula, The Fox. Despite its name, it has nothing whatever to do with planets, it is instead the remnants of a dying star that has cast off its outer atmosphere when nuclear reaction can no longer sustain it. Our Sun will look like this in five billion years from afar. M27 is a fine object to view through a telescope. I have also imaged M27 several times over the years. Here for example. The rendition on this page shows M27 in the HOO or Hydrogen-Oxygen-Oxygen palette which maps the Ha channel to Red and green and Blue to OIII (Oxygen 3). Planetary nebula are rich in Oxygen since it is one of the elements synthesised in the nuclear fusion processes as the star dies. M27 – The Dumbbell Nebula in Vulpecula Image Technical Data Imaged from my backyard observatory in…

A famous planetary nebula in the Northern Hemisphere of the sky in the summer constellation of Lyra. One of four planetary nebulae in the Messier catalog of deep sky objects, the other three being M27, M76 and M97. It is visible in a small telescope as a faint ring. M57 is about 2500 light years away and it is the outer envelope shed off by a dying star, the star itself can be seen right in the middle of the nebula. The Sun will look like this from afar when it does the same in about five billion years from now. More massive stars do not die in this fashion but explode in a cataclysmic event called a supernova; M1 being one such example. In the image below, look for the ghostly outer ring surrounding the main “ring” of the nebula. M57 – The Ring Nebula Image Technical Data Imaged…

The Crab Nebula – M1 – is the expanding remains of a supernova that was seen in 1054 throughput medieval Europe, The Middle East and China.  The nebula is very distant at about 6500 light years and lies in the Perseus Arm of our galaxy, further out from The Galaxy’s core than The Sun.  It is called The Crab because William Parsons from his Irish observatory who first viewed it in 1840 thought it resembled the outline of a crab and the name has stuck.  The object was first observed in the 1731 and was linked to the Supernova of 1054 as recently as 1913.  Earlier photographic plates from the 1950’s and those taken today show a definite expansion in the nebula in the intervening 70 years. M1 – The Crab Nebula Image Technical Data Imaged from my backyard in Nottingham, Uk in the winter of 2017 with a TEC…

NGC 7814 – The Little Sombrero Galaxy NGC 7814 is an edge-on spiral galaxy 40 million light-years away in the constellation of Pegasus.  IT is nicknamed “The Little Sombrero” because of its likeness to The Sombrero Galaxy M104 in Virgo.  Close examination of the picture reveals many tiny galaxies, up to a billion light years away in the depths of The Universe.The dust lanes of the edge-on spiral arms can be easily seen. Image Technical Data NGC 7814 is very remote and so needs a long integration (exposure) time.  This image was captured from my backyard observatory in Nottingham, UK over the course of three nights in October 2019 (a very wet period in the UK and the capture nights were 2,17 and 24).  It took significant dedication to capture the subframes for this image given the dreary weather circumstances  and I nearly gave up on several occasions!  I used…