The Leo Triplet is a popular and famous group of galaxies in the constellation of Leo, best viewed in late winter/early spring in the Northern Hemisphere. They are often imaged together like this as the triplet or as individual galaxies. They are located about 35 million light years away and consists of the Messier galaxies M66 (top left in the image), M65 (bottom left ) and to the right we have NGC 3628, commonly called The Hamburger Galaxy. The galaxies are easily visible in a small to mid-sized telescope as faint smudges in this isosceles triangular pattern. The galaxies are sometimes called the M66 Group but ask any astronomer and they will immediately know what you mean if you mention the Leo Triplet! Another famous galaxy group in Leo is the M96 group. The Leo Triplet Technical Details Image captured from my back yard observatory in Nottingham, UK on the…

The Moon on 25th January 2021 at 89% in Gemini. It was freezing cold, snow on the ground with reasonable skies and seeing conditions. The full disk below is the best 20% in each of the R,G and B filters out of 10000 frames. I used Planetary System Stacker software to process the raw .SER files from the camera and then used PixInsight and Photoshop for processing. I used my TEC140 refractor and ASI174M high speed camera with Baader RGB filters. I no longer capture a separate luminance channel and instead make a synthetic luminance from the RGB data and then sharpen that and use as a luminance layer in Photoshop. RGB Moon at 81%, 25 January 2021 For the two images below I used my Televue 2″ Powermate X2 in order to double the TEC140 telescope’s focal length to 1960mm. The processing and frame set is the same as…

Imaged with a FujiFilm X-T2 and a 55-200m zoom lens (set to 200mm).  Camera mounted on a Skywatcher Star Adventurer to prevent smearing of the image due to 7 second exposures at that focal length.  Imaged at F4 and ISO 800. Jupiter and Saturn Conjunction 20 December 2020, with aircraft landing at East Midlands airport! This set of pictures was taken almost one day before the planets’ closest approach and were taken on 20 December 2020 at 17:20.  The closest approach itself was on the 21st December at 18:00  but that day was clouded out with very heavy rain where I live (as usual, most astronomy special events are clouded out in the UK – typical!). Jupiter and Saturn were around 32 arcminutes apart when this picture was taken, moving to their closest at around 30 arcminutes at their closest the following day.  30 arcminutes is about the same diameter…